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Scott Dinner is member of the firm’s Business Litigation, Antitrust and Unfair Business Practices teams. He has dedicated much of his career to litigating complex, bet-the-company antitrust cases, including numerous cases with hundreds of millions of dollars at stake. Scott draws on his experience in such high-risk matters to not only help his clients strategically navigate disputes but also vigorously advocate for their interests.

Since joining Protorae Law, Scott has focused on litigation involving business disputes such as breach of contract, tortious interference, business conspiracy, trade secret misappropriation, breach of fiduciary duty, and other unfair business practices. He also assists clients in navigating federal and state antitrust laws.

Before joining Protorae Law, Scott was an associate at Straus & Boies LLP where he practiced antitrust and complex litigation. At that firm, Scott assisted clients in successfully pursuing antitrust claims against some of the world’s largest computer memory manufacturers, and breach of contract claims against a Fortune 100 company.

Scott received his Juris Doctorate from the University of Virginia School of Law. While in law school, he received numerous awards for his research and writing skills, including for writing the best brief in the class-wide moot court competition. Prior to law school, Scott graduated from Emory University, where he double majored in philosophy and political science. At Emory, he was a member of the Barkley Forum, one of the most accomplished collegiate debate teams in the nation.

Scott is a member of the Virginia State Bar and the District of Columbia Bar. He also serves on the executive committee of the William B. Bryan American Inn of Court.

Representative Matters

  • Ventech Solutions, Inc. v. Lore Systems, Inc., attained dismissal of two of three damages claims and a partial dismissal of the third claim, and negotiated a favorable resolution in a business dispute between a government contractor and a sub-contractor.
  • G.S. Limited Liability Company v. CESC Commerce Executive Park, LLC, attained a declaratory judgment in favor of a property owner after a three-day bench trial.
  • In re: Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) Antitrust Litigation, successfully pursued antitrust claims against some of the world’s largest manufacturers of computer memory.
  • LaPlant v. Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, attained an $84 million settlement for clients in a case alleging that the defendant deliberately stripped annuity policyholders of their dividend rights.

LEGAL DISCLAIMER: THE RESULTS OF ALL CLIENT MATTERS DEPEND ON A VARIETY OF FACTORS UNIQUE TO EACH MATTER. PAST SUCCESSES DO NOT PREDICT OR GUARANTEE FUTURE SUCCESSES.